About commsbird

I'm a Comms Manager in a rapidly changing industry. Loving the challenge ... and my team.

The Pursuit of PR Accolades: Vanity or Value?

This blog first appeared on the CommsCymru website – after I was asked to write a piece about getting CIPR Chartered Status.

Award trophies on a shelf

Photo credit: Trophies, by Brad K. Reproduced under Creative Commons licence

 

I love working in comms – always have and always will.

But the last 6 months have been extra special for me, thanks to one shiny little trophy and a framed certificate, taking pride of place in my home.

That little trophy was a CIPR PRide Cymru Award – for ‘Best Public Sector Team of the Year’. And, the certificate confirmed that I’d made it as a Chartered PR professional.

Of course I’m biased, but I happen to think my Wales Audit Office comms colleagues are pretty hot at what they do – making public sector accountancy and audit less boring and more meaningful to the people of Wales.

We exist to tell taxpayers’ whether their money is being spent wisely – or not. And, we’re charged with letting the public sector community know what’s working well, what isn’t and how they can improve.

Comms is key to all this. But, making audit accessible can be a challenge. We don’t always get it right. But we try to be innovative and to engage as much as we can.

So, getting recognition like a PRide Award makes it all worthwhile. It’s a nod from the professional institute that we’re doing a good job, adopting the right tools and techniques, putting PR excellence theory into practice (where we can) and demonstrating continuous improvement.

But awards and accolades don’t always sit comfortably with the public sector communicator. After all, we’re here to promote noble causes, statutory responsibility, public service – all against a backdrop of austerity and economic squeeze.

Not surprising then that waving a flag of PR righteousness, a cloak of self-aggrandisement can all seem a bit uncomfortable. Why do so many of us get embarrassed by a bit of self-glory?

But it’s SO important.

Because going for the odd award here or there; working towards that qualification or certificate shapes us – and strengthens the profession. We don’t always win. We don’t always pass. But, it’s the pursuit of success, of demonstrating impact that makes us strive for improvement and to be the best we can be.

Championing professionalism, discipline, and strategic thinking should be encouraged. It’s about establishing our credentials and proving our value to our organisations and, to some extent, the outside world.

So, a few months after the PRide Awards, I decided to go for Chartered PR Practitioner status. The CIPR are actively encouraging eligible members to apply, in a bid to drive up standards and shift PR from a craft to a profession.

In September 2015, only 50 PR professionals had made it to Chartered status since it was introduced in 2008. Shocking when you think there are around 10,000 CIPR members. But the scheme only allowed a small minority to go for it. So they changed the criteria.

Now, if you’re a full Member, Fellow or Honorary Fellow you can attend a Chartership Assessment Day if:

  • you have three consecutive years of CIPR CPD (or five non-consecutive), or
  • if you have two years of CIPR CPD (or four non-consecutive) and hold a Masters degree or the CIPR Diploma.

 

So, in January 2016, I travelled down to CIPR HQ in London for the assessment day, which was a rigorous exercise. Beforehand, I’d been sent reading materials, questions to think about and an overview of what to expect on the day. When I arrived, I was placed in a small discussion group and assessed on my contribution to debates on leadership, strategy and ethics.

Some didn’t make it through the day, so it’s certainly no whitewash. It was a tough but enjoyable experience – and I passed. My reward was a certificate, glass of wine and new letters after my name. But it’s so much more than that.

For me, it was about wanting to get better, to keep moving along the journey of professionalism and to encourage others to do the same – for the cause, for the industry.

At the time of writing this, there are now 89 Chartered PR’s and the CIPR want to increase it to a total of 250 over the next two years.

That’s why I’d really urge other public sector communicators to go for it.

Go for Chartered status.

Go for new qualifications.

Be a bit proud.

There may be a teeny bit of vanity in it – but the value is much greater still.

 

Drink more water, less wine – and other (more useful) PR & Marketing resolutions for 2015

Strawberry SplashAllow me a little bit of self-indulgence, if I may.

I’m feeling sorry for myself because the festive season has been ruined in my house by me coming down with mumps.

The wider family couldn’t come near me so Christmas Day hosting was cancelled – leaving me, the husband and 3 kids faced with consuming more sausage rolls and M&S belly pork ‘bites’ than we knew what to do with.

To make matters worse, the XBoxOne hackers spoilt the kids’ day as it took over 24 hours to download new games. I then went and caught another lurgy.

Quite frankly, it’s left me yearning for a new year and a fresh – healthy – start.
I’ve been reading quite a few blog posts about PR and marketing predictions for 2015, including inspirational posts by industry heavyweights Sarah Hall and Stephen Waddington.

They’ve got me thinking about my own personal resolutions for work and career this coming year.

2015 by Artis Rams
Naturally, I need to chant “drink more water, less wine” and “sit less, move more” every day.

But there are 5 other resolutions on my 2015 to-do list:

  1. Go for CIPR Chartered status and finish it (this time)
    Chartered Practitioner status is a benchmark of professional excellence. It involves a rigorous application and interview process and is not an automatic right for members.
    I started the application process in 2014, but was always ‘too busy’ to finish it. I won’t make the same mistake this year.
  2. Make the most of my mentoring experience
    Selected to be a part of the CIPR’s new mentoring scheme last September, I’ve been matched with a great mentor – a Director of Communications at a leading UK Housing Association.
    I’m determined to get as much as possible out of this professional relationship in 2015. It’s an excellent way of breaking out of the in-house PR comms bubble, of which I’ve blogged about before.
  3. Focus on what works and dispense with what doesn’t
    I was approached by the lovely @danslee from @comms2point0 fame the other week for a blog he’s crowdsourcing on what changed for public sector comms teams in 2014.
    Last year we made our comms more relevant and accessible by introducing new digital channels – Pinterest, Facebook, a blog platform and Yammer (for staff).
    This also helped us sharpen our approach to evaluation. We can now gather even more intelligence about what works and what doesn’t.
    I’m looking forward to continuing to learn the lessons that better evaluation brings and to applying them in 2015.
  4. Meet with other comms teams, offer ideas – and steal theirs!
    There’s nothing like a bit of legitimate ideas theft – ahem, I mean sharing good practice – to make the quality of your work even better.
    We met with some great people last year, including comms teams at the DVLA, Public Health Wales, Audit Scotland, Community Housing Cymru, Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust, Estyn, Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales, Healthcare Inspectorate Wales and Older People’s Commissioner.
    We’ve been inspired to take on new approaches and I know that many of those we’ve met have adopted ideas from us.
  5. Finally, crank up the mojo
    Much of 2014 for me was about managing the work/home juggle after returning from my final maternity leave towards the end of 2013– I blogged about this last year and was overwhelmed by the positive response it received.
    I’ve pretty much mastered it now. I’m really pleased with what I achieved professionally and personally over the last 12 months and am determined to crank up the pace even more next year.

Mojo by Noel Pennington
Sometimes a bit of self-indulgence is what’s needed to refocus and progress your career.

And, I think my festive sick bed has given me the space to do just that.

So, what are your personal PR/comms resolutions?

I’d love to hear them!

 


Pictures reproduced under Creative Commons license:

Strawberry Splash by Christian Gibson

2015 by Artis Rams

Mojo by Neil Pennington

The comms crystal ball: What should the in-house PR team of 2020 look like?

Crystal Ball by Mark Skipper

A chap called Geoffrey Hoyle wrote a book in 1972 – predicting that, by 2010, everyone would be wearing jumpsuits, work a 3 day week and would have electric cars delivered in tubes of liquid.

He also predicted the widespread use of ‘vision phones’ and doing your grocery shopping online.

I was reading a BBC article about it the other day. Apparently, a facebook campaign managed to track Hoyle down, which led to his book – ‘2010: Living in the Future’being reprinted (with the year in the title changed to 2011).

I find the whole thing fascinating and I’m not alone. Futurology is big business. It even has its own twitter handle @the_future – and hashtag #futurology.

The thing that seems to excite all futurologists, more than anything else, is the changing nature of communication – with many predictions, which seemed outlandish when first made, becoming commonplace years later.

David Brin’s 1989 novel – ‘Earth’ – for example, predicted citizen reporters, personalised web interfaces and the decline of privacy. We’re not laughing now.

I do wonder whether we consider this sort of thing enough when trying to future proof our organisations. If I look back just 6 years ago, to the shape, skills and project work of my team – compared with now – it’s almost unrecognisable. What will it be like in another 6 years?

I don’t have all the answers, but I know that if my team is to work brilliantly in 2020, I need to be gearing up for it now and doing a bit of my own futurology.

‘Workforce planning’ is such a yawn phrase. But, whether we like it or not, it’s an absolutely crucial aspect of comms management and it happens to be something I’m focusing on at the moment.

There are 5 key principles I’m working to:

  • Link to strategy

No workforce plan is worth the paper it’s written on if it doesn’t link to your organisation’s corporate strategy, your own comms strategy and your departmental action plans. What are you trying to achieve over the next few years? Is your team equipped to deliver? If not, how will you address it? You need evidence to back up your proposals.

  • Scan the changing landscape

You need to get attuned to the latest comms trends and be aware of what’s on the horizon. Having a focus on the long term, and then planning for it, is a darn sight better than reacting to short term requirements all the time. The future of the PR industry project, run by the PRCA, explores topics such as globalisation, social changes, and new comms platforms and channels and is worth a look as there are some useful online videos available.

  • Plug the gaps

Once you’re clear on your strategy, the future direction of comms and how your organisation should respond, you need to identify any gaps you have that could hamper delivery. Do you and your team need to learn new skills? Is a new post required? Are there comms activities which aren’t needed anymore? Can staff be freed up from old tasks to pursue new priorities? All of these, and more, need to be considered and built into your workforce plan.

  • Consult your team

It should never be done in isolation. Workforce planning needs collective input and your team are best placed to provide feedback, ideas and offer up solutions. They know their department better than anyone.

  • Evaluate as you go along

Regularly review your plan and amend and adjust as you go along. It should be a living document, not shelved away to gather dust for the next 6 years.

 

My future-proofing priorities are all about developing a team of hybrid professionals, multi-skilled communicators, with a greater emphasis on digital skills.

It’s about banishing outmoded and unnecessary activities, freeing up time to pursue more dynamic techniques. And, it’s also about building greater comms skills amongst the wider organisation and securing greater contribution from grassroots staff.

What does your comms crystal ball reveal for the future?

And, do you have a workforce plan to deliver?

Photo credits:

Crystal Ball by Mark Skipper (creative commons)

Fancy a comms cocktail? I’m a trained mixologist don’t you know!

Reproduced under creative commons license

Fluorescent cocktail by Gabriel Millos (creative commons)

When I started out in the brave new world of communications I didn’t realise that cocktail making would be one of the necessary skills I’d need to acquire. But it is – really, it is.

These days, you need to shake, mix, and muddle a whole load of new comms elements if you want your message to compete in a crowded market and get through to people.

A simple Gin and Tonic just won’t cut it anymore – what you really need to be able to do these days is to produce the PR equivalent of the Woo Woo or, dare I say it, Sex on the Beach?!

But while it might sound daunting, actually the secret to any good cocktail rests with some basic key ingredients. And, if you can master these, it’s really easy to mix up something special for your organisation.

Creating Useable content event workbook

Creating Useable Content event workbook by @cooperaj

That’s why the great people behind the 1000 lives campaign hosted the ‘Creating Useable Content’ event this week.

Run by Public Health Wales, it was designed to help public sector communicators learn some of the new skills needed to become great ‘content producers’.

This excellent conference focused on the 5 key elements that all PR professionals need to get to grips with in order to succeed.

 

I’ll share them with you now, in suitable cocktail style:

1) The Blog Bomb:
The influential Dan Slee from comms2point0 encouraged everyone to start blogging – for themselves and their organisations. He talked us through the benefits, explained how to bust the barriers and introduced us to the technology out there to make blogging easy.

2) Video Fizz:
Steve Davies, creative Director of filmcafe, demonstrated how to create videos using the technology we already have – smartphones and tablets. He ran through the essentials for making video content ‘useable’– framing, exposure and sound.

3) Totally Tropical Infographics:
Data expert, Caroline Beavon, showed us how to create infographics. They’re an effective way of sharing complex reports and ideas and she highlighted some excellent design tools (Piktochart, Infogr.am and Raw) where you can produce them yourselves without needing to know about techy stuff like coding. Caroline showed us the various stages you need to go through, including how to order your data.

4) The Photo Royale:
Photographer and artist, Pete Ashton, taught us how to take great photos that get widely shared – explaining composition tricks, such as the rule of two thirds and sight lines.

5) The Social Media Smoothie:
And, social media consultant, Miranda Bishop, gave some excellent advice on planning your social media activity, what content you should post, how often, the scheduling tools out there such as Hootsuite and Buffer and how to make them work for you.

 

Photo of the visual minutes from the day

photo from @fran_ohara

The conference team said they’d consider the event a success if each delegate came away with 5 ideas they can implement.

So, here are my top takeaways and, in the interests of mixology, I’m going to stick with the cocktail theme – and notice below, my very first ever DIY Infographic to illustrate:

 

The Commsbird Cocktail

The CommsBird Cocktail recipe infographic

My DIY Infographic

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz/ 56 ml of Smartphone filming: A smartphone is all you need. Forget the expensive equipment, just use your mobile, a cheap ‘Smartlav’ plug-in microphone and you’re good to go. It’s more spontaneous than large camera kits and easy to use once you get going. Just shoot it, cut it and share it. Simples!

 

  • 1 oz / 28 ml of DIY infographics: You can create them yourself with some fab free tools. Don’t use too many colours though and keep the design clutter free. And remember, creating Infographics is not the job of the design team. It’s a content editor’s responsibility to do the thinking, then brief the designers. Don’t throw them a 200 page report and ask them to create one from scratch.

 

  • 2 ox / 56 ml of YouTube: YouTube is the second biggest search engine. I didn’t realise that. It’s really important to have a presence on this platform if you are to increase your audience reach.

 

  • 1 tbsp of tweeting: Make sure you tweet about your blog or campaign at least 5 times. The average life of a tweet is just 18 minutes, so you need to repeat your messages. Don’t worry about annoying your followers with too many tweets – they made an investment in you when they decided to click the follow button.

 

  • A dash of creative juice: Confidence is key and experimentation is the pathway to success. Keep trying new things to stay ahead of the game and practice, practice, practice.

And, finally, to decorate your cocktail add some fab visual minutes from Fran O’Hara, with a sprinkle of some #content14.

Photo of visual minutes from the event

Visual minutes

I have to say, as a delegate, I really enjoyed the day. It was great to meet new people, learn new tips and tricks and build on the knowledge I’ve already gained.

Do you have some cool ingredients in your cocktail shaker?

(If you’re interested in finding out more about the event – there’s a great Storify of the day).

 

This blog post first appeared on the brilliant comms2point0 website. A big thankyou to @danslee for including it and I hope it puts me in touch with even more fab comms people as a result.